Workshop

New Zealand HPC Applications Workshop 2013

High performance computing (HPC) has the potential to revolutionise New Zealand research. Many of the lessons for applying HPC to research span research disciplines. As New Zealand’s adoption of HPC matures at differing rates across communities and institutions, an opportunity exists to hold an inter-disciplinary event alongside eResearch NZ 2013 to spread knowledge between practitioners and to strengthen the bonds within the HPC community.

Symposium: 

eResearch NZ 2013 session type: 

Submitted by Nick Jones on

The impact of HPC on molecular simulations over the past ten years: Confessions of a reborn researcher

In a past (recent) life I was the director of an HPC centre that saw growth in its HPC capacity of over 50,000 times in ten years. This increase in computer power has had a significant impact on the field of molecular mechanics and the kinds of simulations that can now be routinely undertaken. In this presentation, I will:

Symposium: 

eResearch NZ 2013 session type: 

Submitted by Nick Jones on

Software Carpentry Bootcamp: Helping scientists build better software

This event is an excellent opportunity for researchers who are interested in learning about how to integrate technology into their research practice. Arranged as a set of tutorials and hands-on sessions, Software Carpentry Boot Camps provide proven tools to assist researchers in their day-to-day work.

Who should attend?

Any current researcher who is interested in making use of technology to boost their research practice. Participants will learn how to automate, speed up their research, while making it more reproducible and resilient to data loss.

Symposium: 

eResearch NZ 2013 session type: 

Submitted by Tim McNamara on

Apples and Oranges: Comparing NVIDIA and Intel accelerators (Part of NZ HPC Applications Workshop)

Heterogeneous computing environments consisting of traditional processors and additional compute accelerators are becoming increasingly common in desktop and HPC environments. Manufacturers including NVIDA, AMD and most recently Intel have made significant investments in developing specialised hardware and software to improve the performance of demanding applications by providing support for large scale parallelism.

Symposium: 

eResearch NZ 2013 session type: 

Submitted by Tim McNamara on

Do HPCs at BlueFern and UoA meet MetService's research requirements? (Part of NZ HPC Applications Workshop)

The MetService investigated the performance of the numerical weather prediction model Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) on the Pan cluster in Auckland and the Bluegene/P and AIX in Christchurch, respectively, through a New Zealand eScience Infrastructure proposal development. The weather model was executed in different configurations running different resolutions and parallelised over different amounts of hardware, respectively. The interesting results from these experiments are presented, in particular the performance with regard to cost effectiveness, speed, and scalability.

Symposium: 

eResearch NZ 2013 session type: 

Submitted by Tim McNamara on

An MPI + GPU implementation case study (Part of NZ HPC Applications Workshop)

In this case study presentation we discuss the design and implementation of a high performance electro-magnetic field simulation code. This code is part of an ongoing simulation and modeling research project at the University of Auckland's Institute of Earth Science and Engineering. Because we were seeking optimal performance in this development, native C++ programming was chosen rather than application packages or general purpose libraries.

Symposium: 

eResearch NZ 2013 session type: 

Submitted by Tim McNamara on

Mapping the universe and other embarrassingly parallel problems (Part of the NZ HPC Applications Workshop)

The Sloan Deep Sky Survey (SDSS) is an American astrophysics project in its tenth year, which has the ultimate goal of mapping the observable universe. In July 2012, this project team released over 60 terabytes of scientific data into the public domain, allowing anyone to download their photographic observations and measurements of millions of stars and galaxies. To date, the project team have photographed and collected data on approximately one quarter of all the observable objects in the night sky.

Symposium: 

eResearch NZ 2013 session type: 

Submitted by Tim McNamara on

Using Distributed Computing to accelerate the calculation of a solar exposure map of Christchurch (Part of the NZ HPC Applications Workshop)

Following the Christchurch Earthquakes an opportunity to identify preferred characteristics of a rebuilt city was created through the “Share-an-idea” process organised by Christchurch City Council. One characteristic that received a large amount of support was that the city should be “light and airy”. In an effort to determine the nature of pre-Quake Christchurch a solar exposure map was proposed. The map would show the amount of time that a location could receive sunlight and the amount of time that a location was in shadow.

Symposium: 

eResearch NZ 2013 session type: 

Submitted by Tim McNamara on

Parallel and Distributed Computing with Octave in an HPC environment (Part of NZ HPC Applications Workshop)

Octave is an open-source clone of MATLAB, and is a high-level language for numerical simulations in a wide range of research areas.

Do you frequently solve numerical problems so large and complex that they take hours or even days on a single workstation?

Learn how you can prototype even larger modelling problems in parallel or using distributed memory with Octave in a High Performance Computing environment. Without the cost restriction of MATLAB licenses, it is possible to scale some problems up to hundreds of processors in some circumstances.

Symposium: 

eResearch NZ 2013 session type: 

Submitted by Tim McNamara on

Did asteroids cause the five mass extinctions? (Part of NZ HPC Applications Workshop)

There have been five mass extinctions on Earth over the last 450 million years. The last mass extinction occurred 65 million years ago and there is strong evidence the extinction was initiated by an asteroid ten kilometres in diameter colliding with Earth. It is an open question whether the previous four mass extinctions were initiated by a collision.

Symposium: 

eResearch NZ 2013 session type: 

Submitted by Tim McNamara on

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Workshop